How to Identify Stakeholders in Project Management?
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How to Identify Stakeholders in Project Management?

Projects occur to fulfill the stakeholders’ requirements. If they are not happy, you cannot say that your project was a success. Project management is about managing stakeholders.

You want to complete your project with minimal obstruction. So, you must identify your project stakeholders at an early stage, and then engage with them throughout the project life-cycle.

You start the process of identifying stakeholders after the sponsor signs the project charter.

Stakeholder Register in Project Management
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Stakeholder Register in Project Management

Your project is not successful if your stakeholders are not happy. Stakeholder satisfaction is essential for successful project completion.

According to the PMBOK Guide, “A stakeholder can be a person, a group, or an organization that may be affected, or have any interest in the project, or the project’s outcome; either directly or indirectly.”

What is a Stakeholder Register?
A stakeholder register is a project document that has information about the project stakeholders. It identifies the people, groups, and organizations that have any interest in the work and the outcome.

Stakeholders in Project Management
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Stakeholders in Project Management

Your project’s success depends on the satisfaction of your stakeholders. Sometimes, you have completed the project; the client has accepted all deliverables. However, the project is not successful because some of your stakeholders are not happy.

Stakeholder satisfaction is the sign of successful project completion.

Now, you might be wondering who the stakeholders are and whom you have to satisfy for the successful completion of your project.

I am writing this blog post to answer these queries, and I hope to clear up any doubts you may have about project stakeholders

Work Performance Information (WPI) vs Work Performance Measurements (WPM)
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Work Performance Information (WPI) vs Work Performance Measurements (WPM)

This blog post was based on the 4th edition of the PMBOK Guide, and from the 5th edition of the PMBOK Guide, the PMI has changed the definitions of terms used in this blog post; therefore, this post is now obsolete.

I have re-written this blog post based on the current version of the PMBOK Guide (6th edition). Please visit: Work Performance Data and Work Performance Information. I am leaving this post in case someone wants to review the old post under the PMBOK Guide (4th edition).

Management is always interested in the status and progress of the project. They want to know:

Enterprise Environmental Factors (EEF) & Organizational Process Assets (OPA)
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Enterprise Environmental Factors (EEF) & Organizational Process Assets (OPA)

Though the nature of a project is temporary, they are not performed in isolation. They work in a controlled environment and affected by Enterprise Environmental Factors (EEF) and Organizational Process Assets (OPA).

The Project Management Institute terms them as influences. Enterprise environmental factors can be internal or external, while organizational process assets are always internal to an organization.

Enterprise environmental factors and organizational process assets are widely discussed in the PMBOK Guide and are inputs of almost all processes. You must have a thorough understanding of these terms.

Although the concepts are straightforward, many PMP aspirants fail to understand them and often make mistakes on the exam.