Project Scope Statement: A Guide with Example & Template

Project Scope Statement: A Guide with Example & Template

The project scope statement is one of the most important project documents. You must understand it if you are in project management. This statement is a part of the scope baseline. Other components of the scope baseline are Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) and WBS Dictionary. I will explain the project scope statement in detail in…

Control Quality versus Validate Scope
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Control Quality versus Validate Scope

The control quality and validate scope processes help you build the right product and deliver it to the client. These are important processes and you should understand them well.

However, before we discuss these processes, let’s have a quick look at the meanings of “validate” and “verify.” I have seen many experienced professionals who don’t understand the difference between the two terms.

Verification is about building the product correctly.

Assumptions and Constraints in Project Management
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Assumptions and Constraints in Project Management

In project management, we make assumptions and constraints always limit us. They are also a part of our lives.

For example, suppose you plan to go shopping at a mall that takes one hour to reach by car.

You assumed that you would leave your home at around 6:00 pm and reach the mall by 7:00 pm.

This was your assumption. What about the constraints?

In the given example, you can think of two. The first constraint is money. If you have 500 USD in your hand, you cannot shop for more than this amount. The second constraint is the mall’s closing time; let us say it is at 10:30 pm. This means you cannot continue your shopping after that.

Work Performance Information (WPI) vs Work Performance Measurements (WPM)
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Work Performance Information (WPI) vs Work Performance Measurements (WPM)

This blog post was based on the 4th edition of the PMBOK Guide, and from the 5th edition of the PMBOK Guide, the PMI has changed the definitions of terms used in this blog post; therefore, this post is now obsolete.

I have re-written this blog post based on the current version of the PMBOK Guide (6th edition). Please visit: Work Performance Data and Work Performance Information. I am leaving this post in case someone wants to review the old post under the PMBOK Guide (4th edition).

Management is always interested in the status and progress of the project. They want to know:

Project Plan vs Project Management Plan
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Project Plan vs Project Management Plan

A few months back I attended a local PMI chapter seminar. While I was having a conversation with other professionals, this topic arose: “Are project plan and project management plan the same?”

This discussion led us to some interesting discoveries, which I am going to share, along with my research on the topic.

During our conversation, we concluded that there was no standard difference between the project plan and project management plan.

The organization you work for determines the difference. They may decide to stick with only one term, both terms may be used as synonyms of each other, or they can refer to different types of plans.

Product Scope vs Project Scope
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Product Scope vs Project Scope

Projects are undertaken to deliver a product, service, or result. It will be difficult to achieve your objective if you don’t understand both the project and product scope. In project management, you will find many important concepts vital to complete your project with minimal obstacles. Among these terms and concepts, project scope and product scope stand out.

Project scope depends entirely on the product scope. You must understand the product scope to define the project scope. These are the most important concepts in project management. I have noticed that many professionals incorrectly use these terms synonymously.

I saw a related question posted in a PMP forum a few days ago. Someone was asking for clarification on the differences between project scope and product scope. There were many replies, however some were incomplete, and a few of them were wrong. It seemed like the posters were more concerned with supporting their own opinions.

Quality Control vs Verify Scope
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Quality Control vs Verify Scope

In the PMBOK Guide, fifth edition, the validate scope process has replaced the verify scope process; therefore, this post is obsolete. Please refer to my new blog post on quality control and validate scope.

The quality control and verify scope processes are important for a project as they ensure that the deliverable is defect free and meets the user’s requirements.

Since both processes involve inspection and testing many professionals get confused and think that they are the same. They have different objectives and are carried out with a different goal in mind.

Enterprise Environmental Factors (EEF) & Organizational Process Assets (OPA)
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Enterprise Environmental Factors (EEF) & Organizational Process Assets (OPA)

Though the nature of a project is temporary, they are not performed in isolation. They work in a controlled environment and affected by Enterprise Environmental Factors (EEF) and Organizational Process Assets (OPA).

The Project Management Institute terms them as influences. Enterprise environmental factors can be internal or external, while organizational process assets are always internal to an organization.

Enterprise environmental factors and organizational process assets are widely discussed in the PMBOK Guide and are inputs of almost all processes. You must have a thorough understanding of these terms.

Although the concepts are straightforward, many PMP aspirants fail to understand them and often make mistakes on the exam.