Critical Path Method (CPM) in Project Management
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Critical Path Method (CPM) in Project Management

Critical Path Method (CPM) is a project schedule modeling technique. Mr. Morgan R. Walker and James E. Kelly developed this technique in the late 1950s.

Project planners use this method to develop schedules for many kinds of projects including IT, research, and construction.

Critical Path Method is a lengthy and complex concept. Please follow each step in this blog post and don’t move on until you understand the previous steps. If you follow this advice and complete the blog post, you won’t have any problems solving the questions on Critical Path Method.

Critical Chain Method (CCM) in Project Management
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Critical Chain Method (CCM) in Project Management

The Critical Path Method helps project managers develop and manage the schedule in the past.

This method makes the life of a project manager easy. They can plan activities with less effort, and this was a good communication tool.

However, there were many issues with the schedules developed by critical path methods. These schedules were not realistic, and projects started getting delayed, which caused crossing their cost baselines.

Many times these delays led to project termination, and this was hurting companies financially.

Precedence Diagramming Method (Activity on Node Method) in Scheduling
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Precedence Diagramming Method (Activity on Node Method) in Scheduling

A Precedence Diagramming Method (PDM) is a graphical representation technique. It shows the inter-dependencies of activities and is used in schedule development. The other name for this technique is Activity on Node (AON).

We use this method in drawing the project schedule network diagrams; for example, critical path network, critical chain network diagram, and others.

The Precedence Diagramming Method shows activity relationships. Hence, it is an important communication tool for stakeholders.

Fast-Tracking vs Crashing – Schedule Compression Techniques
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Fast-Tracking vs Crashing – Schedule Compression Techniques

There are many reasons you may want to compress the schedule.

Your project could have been delayed and you have to bring it back on schedule.

Management may also ask you to compress the schedule. Often this happens when your resources are needed for a new opportunity.

Project delays can happen for many reasons. For example: an unrealistic schedule

PERT – Program Evaluation and Review Technique
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PERT – Program Evaluation and Review Technique

Schedule baseline and cost baseline are the two most important performance measurement baselines for any project. Cost baseline helps you assess the cost performance of the project, while the schedule baseline involves the duration.

Clients are very interested in the schedule because any delay can affect their business. So, project managers should give schedule development a top priority.

Developing a schedule is a big task and requires a thorough knowledge of schedule network diagramming techniques and experience.

Total Float vs Free Float
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Total Float vs Free Float

I never thought that total float and free float were different concepts before my PMP exam preparation. I used to think they were synonymous.

While reading the Head First PMP book, I came to understand the difference between these two terms.

Total floats and free floats have an important role in the development of a network diagram. A better understanding of these terms will help you draw a network diagram and analyze a critical path.

You will see a few questions on this topic in your exam; it is an important concept.

Project Management Dependencies: Types, Examples, and Explanations
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Project Management Dependencies: Types, Examples, and Explanations

Today in this blog post, we will discuss project management dependencies. Dependencies in project management play an important role in developing the project schedule. You cannot develop your project network diagram before determining dependencies among the project tasks. So, if you are into project management and dealing with schedules or planning, you must understand the…

Work Performance Information (WPI) vs Work Performance Measurements (WPM)
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Work Performance Information (WPI) vs Work Performance Measurements (WPM)

This blog post was based on the 4th edition of the PMBOK Guide, and from the 5th edition of the PMBOK Guide, the PMI has changed the definitions of terms used in this blog post; therefore, this post is now obsolete.

I have re-written this blog post based on the current version of the PMBOK Guide (6th edition). Please visit: Work Performance Data and Work Performance Information. I am leaving this post in case someone wants to review the old post under the PMBOK Guide (4th edition).

Management is always interested in the status and progress of the project. They want to know: