Common Cause Vs Special Cause Variations

Common Cause Vs Special Cause Variations

Processes always have variations, which can be common cause or special cause variations. The factors that cause variances in project performance are: Changes in project scope. Lack of resources. Wrong estimates. Incorrect identification of scheduled activities. Wrong project reviews. Poorly implemented project management processes. Poor risk review. Inefficient change control procedures. Modifications in the regulatory…

What is the Best Power of the Project Manager?
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What is the Best Power of the Project Manager?

A project’s environment is much like a startup company’s environment. There is continuous pressure to perform with a limited budget and a fixed schedule. More importantly, you will always have new team members.

In this situation, you will have to manage your team and motivate them to perform their best.

This is not an easy task, and you will have to use your soft and hard skills to push team members continuously.

As a project manager, you can have many powers. The sixth edition of the PMBOK Guide recognizes the following fourteen powers:

S-Curve in Project Management: Examples with Definitions

S-Curve in Project Management: Examples with Definitions

Today we will discuss the s-curve in project management and provide you with its definitions and examples. S-curve is a graph that shows the relevant cumulative data for your project. The data can be costs, person-hours, etc. S-curve is a good communication tool and helps project managers communicate project progress to project stakeholders. Let’s dive…

Verification vs Validation
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Verification vs Validation

Validation and verification are two important terms in project management; they seem very similar, and it’s easy to get them confused.

These are important concepts and any PMP aspirants needs to understand them well. I will explain these terms fully, so you will have a better understanding of them when you finish this blog post.

This topic is not very important from the PMP exam point of view. However, as a project manager, you must know the difference between these terms.

Quality Assurance vs Quality Control (QA Vs QC)
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Quality Assurance vs Quality Control (QA Vs QC)

Quality assurance and quality control are most important processes for any project, as the project’s success depends on these processes.

Every project has a quality control section to take care of these functions. The quality assurance function usually stays with the organization and the quality control section has to communicate with the organization to coordinate between these two processes.

Since these processes are connected and work in coordination, many professionals, especially those working in small and medium sized organizations, do not understand their differences.

This reminds me of one interaction when I was in my ISO 9001 training course a few years back. I met with many professionals involved in quality management. These people were all from different backgrounds and were working in various fields.

5 Conflict Resolution Techniques in Project Management
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5 Conflict Resolution Techniques in Project Management

In project management, the work environment is dynamic and stressful, unlike a functional environment where it is very stable. Conflict is a common occurrence in this field.

Whenever two or more stakeholders have different opinions or interests, conflict can occur. According to the American Management Association, managers spend 24% of their time managing conflicts.

Conflicts happen due to many reasons, such as schedule priorities, scarce resources, technical reasons, and personal issues.

Don’t panic, it’s usually not as bad as you think. If appropriately managed, conflict resolution can build trust and sometimes bring new ideas and opportunities. Proper conflict resolution can make the difference between a positive and negative outcome, and an incorrect resolution can negatively affect a project.

Validated Deliverables Versus Accepted Deliverables
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Validated Deliverables Versus Accepted Deliverables

This blog post was written based on the fourth edition of the PMBOK Guide. Since the arrival of the PMBOK Guide 5th Edition, this post is no longer valid. However, I am leaving it intact as part of organizational process assets. If you wish to review old definitions you can read them here.

Many PMP aspirants may confuse validated deliverables and accepted deliverables. They seem similar, but they are not.

Validated deliverables and accepted deliverables are important concepts in project management. You will see a few questions on these topics on your PMP exam.

Grade versus Quality
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Grade versus Quality

Grade and quality are two of the most commonly used terms in project management. Not just in this field either; you will use these terms on a daily basis. For example, people frequently say that this is a low-grade product, this is a high-grade product, this is a low-quality product, or this is a high-quality product.

What does that actually mean?

Does “low-grade” mean bad or undesirable and “high-grade” always mean good?

To put it simply, no. low-grade and high-grade are not necessarily right or wrong, and that is what we are going to discuss in this blog post.

Grade and quality are fascinating concepts; however, even professionals don’t understand their differences and mistakenly use them synonymously. They are not difficult terms to understand, we simply need to pay them a bit more attention.

Precision Versus Accuracy
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Precision Versus Accuracy

Precision and accuracy are characteristics of measurement, which plays an important role in quality management. If the collected measurements do not meet the requirements, the deliverable cannot be accepted and is said to be of poor-quality.

You analyze the collected data for the accuracy and precision of the deliverable. If the measurements are accurate and precise, you will accept the deliverable. Otherwise, you will ask for corrective action.

A perfectly acceptable deliverable must be accurate and precise.